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militarymom:

Please, pass around so maybe Troops might benefit from the info. These pups are a life line for Our Troops and it kills them have to leave them behind. =(

1. For anyone who has a furry friend, pet/mascot they wish to rescue from Afghanistan, please send an email to: anna@ thepuppyrescuemission. org Please use the subject heading “Package”. All requests for rescues must go via this email address from your personal email. Thank You!

2. nowzad. com

3. spcai. org /baghdad-pups/requesting-help. html If you have questions concerning a dog or cat in Afghanistan, please contact us directly.

PLEASE, don’t delete the info to reblog just the pictures, I made this post to HELP OUR TROOPS find a way to bring home their combat buddies =/

All of these soldiers deserve to come home.

queenofdaffodils:

So, another Youmacon has come and gone.  My original plan was to cosplay as Sansa along with my friend who went as Sandor, but because of major malfunctions in fabric orders and such, along with the fact that most of my homework was sewing, so all the time I wanted to use for sewing my cosplay was used to work on my actual homework.

Anyways, I decided to go as Beka Cooper, from Tamora Pierce’s Provost Dogs series.  I based my costume somewhat off of the cover photos of the series, but I was mostly inspired by minuiko's drawings of Beka.

Sadly, only one person recognized me, and it was after I mentioned that I was a TP character, but I made my friends walk ahead of me and yell ‘Puppy, fetch!’ and then I would go and chase them down. We also ran from Cobo Hall to the Renaissance Center, and the whole time I kept yelling “Provost Guard! Get out of the way!” and that was all fun.

I hope to make this a better cosplay, and add Kel and Daine possibly to my growing list of TP characters~

EDIT: Also, forgot to add that my friend abananaduck took the pics <3

Oh nice. Very nice. I love it! 

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Maybe a loaded question, but if you had one piece of advice for an aspiring comic book writer, what might it be?

gailsimone:

Read books on history. Honest to god, this is my number one piece of advice for writers. Most non-fiction books will give you SOME ideas for stories, but books on historical events and persons are huge idea factories, in a way that the internet just doesn’t quite replicate.

So every time I go to a book shop, I check their remainder shelves for books on interesting historical events and grab them up. It is a person with a very poor imagination indeed who can’t come up with ideas after reading this stuff…My first Deadpool villain was based on King Ludwig II, the ‘mad king,’ of Bavaria. Secret Six dealt directly with prison allegories based on North Korea, China, and Ireland. The beastmaster story in Red Sonja is based on Roman arenas in rural Wales. 

This stuff is precious as gold and you can get it for almost nothing on sale at bookshops anywhere.

For the actual PROCESS of writing, the advice I have is FINISH something. Start SMALL, a column or a paragraph or a very, very short story. FINISH. That’s what counts. The act of writing teaches skills, but the act of FINISHING teaches confidence. And you will NEED CONFIDENCE.

Finish things. Finish your story and do another. An unfinished story does no one any good. FINISH.

Good ideas for short story, play and screenplay, and novel writers as well as comics writers!

todaysdocument:


“I don’t know whether I am doing a right deed as to plead to you. But I do know that I am all right to plead for my race…I am a Southern colored girl in New York.” –Miss South Carolinean, April 10, 1933
Letter from Miss South Carolinean [Carolinian] to President Franklin Roosevelt Regarding the Scottsboro Case

Clarence Norris, Charlie Weems, Haywood Patterson, Ozie Powell, Willie Robertson, Eugene Williams, Olen Montgomery, Andy Wright, and Ray Wright were known as the “Scottsboro Boys.” In 1931, the nine African Americans were tried and convicted of assault and rape in Alabama by all-white juries within two weeks. Eight were sentenced to death. In this letter to Franklin Roosevelt, “Miss South Carolinian” asked for the President’s help. 
The initial speedy trials, the age of the defendants, the racial bias of the juries and the severity of the sentences led to arguments that the defendants never received fair trials and a movement to free them. Their case went to the Supreme Court of the United States, which ruled they were denied the right to counsel, violating their right to due process under the 14th amendment. Eventually, their sentences were commuted and charges against four were dropped, but their lives were forever changed as most spent years in jail.  On November 21, 2013, posthumous pardons were issued by the state of Alabama to Charlie Weems, Andy Wright and Haywood Patterson.  
(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)

This letter is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.

A landmark case.  We still aren&#8217;t as far from this as we should be.
Zoom Info
todaysdocument:


“I don’t know whether I am doing a right deed as to plead to you. But I do know that I am all right to plead for my race…I am a Southern colored girl in New York.” –Miss South Carolinean, April 10, 1933
Letter from Miss South Carolinean [Carolinian] to President Franklin Roosevelt Regarding the Scottsboro Case

Clarence Norris, Charlie Weems, Haywood Patterson, Ozie Powell, Willie Robertson, Eugene Williams, Olen Montgomery, Andy Wright, and Ray Wright were known as the “Scottsboro Boys.” In 1931, the nine African Americans were tried and convicted of assault and rape in Alabama by all-white juries within two weeks. Eight were sentenced to death. In this letter to Franklin Roosevelt, “Miss South Carolinian” asked for the President’s help. 
The initial speedy trials, the age of the defendants, the racial bias of the juries and the severity of the sentences led to arguments that the defendants never received fair trials and a movement to free them. Their case went to the Supreme Court of the United States, which ruled they were denied the right to counsel, violating their right to due process under the 14th amendment. Eventually, their sentences were commuted and charges against four were dropped, but their lives were forever changed as most spent years in jail.  On November 21, 2013, posthumous pardons were issued by the state of Alabama to Charlie Weems, Andy Wright and Haywood Patterson.  
(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)

This letter is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.

A landmark case.  We still aren&#8217;t as far from this as we should be.
Zoom Info

todaysdocument:

I don’t know whether I am doing a right deed as to plead to you. But I do know that I am all right to plead for my race…I am a Southern colored girl in New York.” –Miss South Carolinean, April 10, 1933

Letter from Miss South Carolinean [Carolinian] to President Franklin Roosevelt Regarding the Scottsboro Case

Clarence Norris, Charlie Weems, Haywood Patterson, Ozie Powell, Willie Robertson, Eugene Williams, Olen Montgomery, Andy Wright, and Ray Wright were known as the “Scottsboro Boys.” In 1931, the nine African Americans were tried and convicted of assault and rape in Alabama by all-white juries within two weeks. Eight were sentenced to death. In this letter to Franklin Roosevelt, “Miss South Carolinian” asked for the President’s help. 

The initial speedy trials, the age of the defendants, the racial bias of the juries and the severity of the sentences led to arguments that the defendants never received fair trials and a movement to free them. Their case went to the Supreme Court of the United States, which ruled they were denied the right to counsel, violating their right to due process under the 14th amendment. Eventually, their sentences were commuted and charges against four were dropped, but their lives were forever changed as most spent years in jail.  On November 21, 2013, posthumous pardons were issued by the state of Alabama to Charlie Weems, Andy Wright and Haywood Patterson.  

(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)

This letter is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.

A landmark case.  We still aren’t as far from this as we should be.

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